1984 Soundtrack – Streets Of Fire

Streets of Fire is a 1984 film directed by Walter Hill and co-written by Hill and Larry Gross.

Jimmy Iovine produced five of the songs for the film and the soundtrack album. For Ellen Aim’s singing voice, he combined the voices of Laurie Sargent and Holly Sherwood, billing them as “Fire Incorporated.” The Attackers were the real-life (Face to Face) bandmates of Sargent, who provided the lead vocals on Ellen Aim’s songs “Nowhere Fast”, “Never Be You” and “Sorcerer”, and supporting vocals on “Tonight Is What It Means to Be Young.” The version of “Sorcerer,” written and composed by Stevie Nicks, that was featured on the actual soundtrack album was performed by Marilyn Martin. The version of “Never Be You” that was featured on the soundtrack album was performed by Maria McKee.

Two songs written by Jim Steinman were part of the soundtrack: “Tonight Is What It Means to Be Young” and “Nowhere Fast”, both performed by “Fire Incorporated”, with Holly Sherwood providing lead vocals on the former and Laurie Sargent on the latter. The title of the former was used as the tagline on some promotional materials for the film. Dan Hartman’s selection “I Can Dream About You” is the most successful song from the movie, and became a Billboard top 10 hit in 1984 (also from his studio album of the same name). In the movie, the song is performed on stage at the end of the film by “The Sorels,” a fictional doo-wop style group consisting of actors Stoney Jackson, Grand L. Bush, Mykelti Williamson, and Robert Townsend. However, the song was actually sung for the film by Winston Ford, whose vocals were lip-synched by Jackson in the movie. While there are thus two versions of the song, only Hartman’s version was released commercially.

Steinman later recalled thinking the script was “terrible”, but he thought the film was going to be a big hit, in part because of the enthusiasm of Joel Silver:

He said this movie is about visuals. It’s about excitement, it’s about thrills. Don’t worry about the script… I remember mentioning it to six or seven people that the script was trashy and I always got the same answer… The script doesn’t matter. This movie is about visuals… Then we go to the first edit, the first cut of the movie in the screening room and it’s Jimmy Iovine and me and Joel Silver… And about 20 minutes into the movie Jimmy turns to me and he goes… this movie is really shitty isn’t it? It’s really bad. I said, yeah, it’s a really bad script. Why didn’t anyone notice that the script was bad? It stinks. I can’t even watch it… Joel’s on the other side going, what am I gonna do next? There’s gotta be a next project, and they’re sitting there and there’s so many lessons I learned during that movie. It went $14 million over budget, I think and I kept saying to Joel, how are they allowing this? ‘Cause they kept screaming at us, it’s over the budget. I said, how, and they, you’ve gotta understand, they built all, Walter Hill didn’t want to go to Chicago. The story took place in Chicago, so they built Chicago in LA.
Steinman has said the filmmakers were convinced they would have the rights to the Bruce Springsteen song Streets of Fire, and filmed an ending using it. However, when they realised they would not get it in time, they asked Steinman for a song, which he wrote in two days.

So I wrote this song that I loved and I sent it to them and he and Joel, I remember, left me a great message saying, I hate you, you bastard, I love this song. We’re gonna have to do it. We’re gonna have to re-build the Wiltern Theater, which they had taken down, it was a million dollars to re-do the ending… and I felt all his hostility for Universal. A guy named Sean Daniels, who was head of production, one day said to me, well there is hostility because we understand you waited about eight months to come up with that final song and you never did it. I said, where’d you hear that? I did it in two days. He said, Jimmy Iovine. So I went to Jimmy Iovine and I said all that to his, yeah it’s true, I know. I blamed you but you can’t be upset with me. I’m not like a writer. I’ve gotta make my way with these people. I had to have a scapegoat.
The Blasters, who turned down the chance to appear in Hill’s 48 Hours, appear in the film performing two songs

Tracks

1  Fire Inc – Nowhere Fast (Jim Steinman) 6:04
2  Marilyn Martin – Sorcerer (Stevie Nicks) 5:11
3  The Fixx – Deeper And Deeper (Dan K Brown, Adam Woods, Jamie West-Oram, Rupert Greenall, Cy Curnin) 3:48
Greg Phillinganes – Countdown To Love (Kenny Vance, Marty Kupersmith) 2:59
5  The Blasters – One Bad Stud (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) 2:31
6  Fire Inc – Tonight Is What It Means To Be Young (Jim Steinman) 6:56
7  Maria McKee – Never Be You (Tom Petty, Benmont Tench) 4:06
8  Dan Hartman – I Can Dream About You (Dan Hartman) 4:12
9  Ry Cooder – Hold That Snake (Ry Cooder, Jim Dickinson) 2:40
10  The Blasters – Blue Shadows (Dave Alvin) 3:15

Media

Musicians

1 Fire Inc – Nowhere Fast

BassSteve Buslowe
Drums (programming)Joe Stefko
Drums (programming)Jimmy Bralower
GuitarDavey Johnstone
GuitarMike Landau
KeyboardsJim Steinman
PianoRoy Bittan
SynthesizerLarry Fast
Background VocalsEric Troyer
VocalsHolly Sherwood
VocalsRory Dodd


2 Marilyn Martin – Sorcerer

BassKenny Edwards
DrumsRuss Kunkel
GuitarWaddy Wachtel
PianoBill Payne
Background VocalsLori Perry
Background VocalsSharon Celani
VocalsMarilyn Martin


3 The Fixx – Deeper And Deeper

BassDan K Brown
DrumsAdam Woods
GuitarJamie West-Oram
KeyboardsRupert Greenall
PercussionAdam Woods
VocalsCy Curnin


4 Greg Phillinganes – Countdown To Love

All Other InstrumentsGreg Phillinganes
Drums (programming)Anthony Marinelli
Drums (programming)Brian Banks
GuitarDavid Williams
SynthesizerAnthony Marinelli
SynthesizerBrian Banks
VocalsGreg Phillinganes


5 The Blasters – One Bad Stud

BassJohn Bazz
DrumsBill Bateman
GuitarDave Alvin
PianoGene Taylor
SaxLee Allen
SaxSteve Berlin
VocalsPhil Alvin


6 Fire Inc – Tonight Is What It Means To Be Young

BassSteve Buslowe
DrumsMax Weinberg
DrumsJimmy Bralower
Drums (programming)Joe Stefko
Drums (programming)Jimmy Bralower
GuitarDavey Johnstone
GuitarMike Landau
KeyboardsJim Steinman
PianoRoy Bittan
SynthesizerLarry Fast
Background VocalsEric Troyer
Background VocalsHolly Sherwood
Background VocalsRory Dodd
VocalsLaurie Sargent


7 Maria McKee – Never Be You

BassBenmont Tench
DrumsStan Lynch
GuitarMike Campbell
GuitarTom Petty
Steel GuitarRay Austin
PianoBenmont Tench
VocalsMaria Mckee


8 Dan Hartman – I Can Dream About You

BassEddie Watkins Jr
DrumsArt Wood
GuitarRichie Zito
PianoBill Payne
PercussionBobbye Hall
Background VocalsJoe Pizzulo
Background VocalsWinston Ford
VocalsDan Hartman


9 Ry Cooder – Hold That Snake

BassTim Drummond
DrumsJim Keltner
GuitarRy Cooder
HarmonicaJohn Logan
KeyboardsJim Dickinson
SaxSteve Douglas
PercussionGeorge Pierre
Background VocalsBobby King
Background VocalsWillie Greene
VocalsRy Cooder


10 The Blasters – Blue Shadows

BassJohn Bazz
DrumsBill Bateman
GuitarDave Alvin
GuitarPhil Alvin
PianoGene Taylor
SaxLee Allen
SaxSteve Berlin
VocalsPhil Alvin

Liner Notes

Producer – Jim Steinman (Tracks 1, 6)
Producer – Jimmy Iovine (Tracks 2, 7, 8)
Producer – Rupert Hine (Track 3)
Producer – Richard Perry, Greg Phillinganes (Track 4)
Producer – Pat Burnette, Phil Alvin (Tracks 5, 10)
Producer – Tom Petty (Track 7)
Producer – Dan Hartman (Track 8)
Producer – Ry Cooder (Track 9)
Producer (Associate) – John Jansen (Tracks 1, 6)
Producer (Executive) – Joel Silver
Production Manager (Associate) – Elaine K. Thompson
Arranged By – Jim Steinman (Tracks 1, 6)
Coordinator (Music Coordinator) – Amy Ross
Coordinator (Production Coordinator) – Janet Weber
Coordinator (Production Coordinator) – Don Ketteler, Janet Weber (Tracks 1, 6)
Engineer – Stephen W. Tayler (Track 3)
Engineer (Additional) – Bobby Gerber, Gabe Veltri, Julian Stoll, Shelly Yakus (Track 8)
Engineer – Arthur Payson, Bill Scheniman, Greg Edward, Neil Dorfsman, Shelly Yakus (Tracks 1, 6)
Engineer (Assistant) – Alan Weidel (Track 7)
Engineer (Assistant) – Tom Gondolf (Track 2)
Engineer (Assistant) – Garry Rindfuss, Julian Stoll, Robin Eaton (Tracks 1, 6) (Tracks 1, 6)
Engineer (Sound Supervisor) – Michael Tronick, Rick Kline, Shelly Yakus
Mastered By – Stephen Marcussen
Mastered By – Greg Calbi (Tracks 1, 6)
Mixed By – John Jansen (Track 1)
Mixed By – Shelly Yakus (Track 2)
Mixed By – John Arrias (Track 4)
Mixed By – Pat Burnette (Track 5)
Mixed By – Bob Clearmountain (Track 6)
Mixed By – Tom Petty, Don Smith (Track 7)
Mixed By – Humberto Gatica (Track 8)
Mixed By – Allen Sides (Track 9)
Recorded By – Shelly Yakus (Track 2)
Recorded By – Michael Brooks (Track 4)
Recorded By – Tom Petty, Don Smith (Track 7)
Recorded By – Dan Hartman (Track 8)
Recorded By – Allen Sides (Track 9)
Recorded By – Pat Burnette (Track 10)
Supervised By – Jimmy Iovine
Tape Op – Andrew Scarth (Track 3)

Photography By – Edie Baskin